Read

Recommended pukapuka (books), articles, and lit literature to expand ideas, knowledge and perspective.

He Hoaka blog – Kim McBreen

Kim is one of my most favourite writers. She puts really quite complex (and traumatic) ideas really simply and clearly and with a dusting of humor. It’s a very thoughtful and Māori way of writing. Her subjects include supportive restorative justice, takatāpui issues, adoption and whāngai, and perspectives on colonisation generally. https://hehoaka.com/?page_id=100

Moko kauae

An article detailing the book on Ariana Tikao’s moko kauae journey. https://i.stuff.co.nz/life-style/130306246/why-ariana-tikao-wants-you-to-know-exactly-how-she-got-her-moko-kauae

Indigenous reo

Cool perspective on learning from other indigenous peoples, forming those indigenous connections and how we can take inspiration from other indigenous peoples: https://www.raglanchronicle.co.nz/the-chronicle/2022/09/reclaiming-culture-through-rongoa-maori-waiata-and-te-reo/

The Mana Wahine Reader Vols 1 and 2

Click to access Mana%20Wahine%20Volume%201.pdf

Click to access Mana%20Wahine%20Volume%202.pdf

The mana wahine readers vols 1 and 2  are compilations of writing that I return to again and again. Def recommended if you are keen to understand wāhine Māori thought, concepts and roles (spoiler alert, kaupapa wāhine Māori is hella multi-faceted). I think I approach these texts in a very Māori way. Dip in, absorb and return for clarification and better understanding. Knowledge is a journey, not something you attain, discard, and move on.

The Honour Project

Click to access Honour-Project-Aotearoa-Final-Report.pdf

Inspired by the OG Native American Honor Project exploring wellness and wellbeing in American Indian and Alaska Native two-spirit communities, the Honour Project Aotearoa investigates health and wellbeing of takatāpui/Māori LGBTQI-plus communities. Along with this report, there are videographic interviews with some of the participants available online (https://www.waikato.ac.nz/rangahau/koi-te-mata-punenga-innovation/research/hauora-health/honourproject/honour-project-digital-stories).

Infinite Threads, by Mariko B Ryan

Based on mātauranga from transcripts left by the author’s tīpuna. Beautifully potent prose full of knowledge, insights and epiphanies:

https://christchurch.bibliocommons.com/v2/record/S37C1155568

An interview with the author (who’s pen name is a pseudonym):

https://podcast.flowartists.com/episodes/mariko-b-ryan/

I love James Nokise’s take on things. Here’s an article he wrote about one of our best and most underrated cricketers. Brown greatness in one of the whitest of sports:

Despite the name, Ngā Tamatoa were heavily populated by wāhine. Very strong wāhine:

https://www.teaomaori.news/women-led-everything-nga-tamatoa-member

I love the intersect between mātauranga Māori and science. Ever since studying under the profound Dr Ocean Mercier, I appreciate how these two realms of knowledge can be complimentary, while being uniquely distinct:

How to Loiter in a Turf War, by Coco Solid

https://www.penguin.co.nz/books/how-to-loiter-in-a-turf-war-9780143778585

An interview with Coco on the book: https://www.rnz.co.nz/national/programmes/ninetonoon/audio/2018851166/coco-solid-s-hit-book-how-to-loiter-in-a-turf-war

Imagining Decolonisation: a collection of epiphany-inducing essays

https://www.bwb.co.nz/books/imagining-decolonisation/

Stepping Up: Covid-19 checkpoints and rangatiratanga, by Maria Bargh and Luke Fitzmaurice

Stepping Up: COVID-19 Checkpoints and Rangatiratanga